Be Part of the “Do Something” Campaign

Trauma Counselling in Sydney

Be part of the “Do Something” campaign and help reduce the scourge of Domestic Violence in our Country.


The “Do Something” campaign being rolled out online, on television, in cinemas and public space advertising, in a bid to encourage more people to speak out about domestic violence.

Some of the recent recounts of victims encounter with domestic violence is highlighted on a couple of articles on the ABC television’s website.

Domestic violence survivor urges people to speak out about violence in their neighbourhood

Lucy (name changed) had been through domestic violence and strongly feels:

‘If someone had helped me that might’ve made a difference’

Domestic violence survivor Lucy, whose name has been changed, said she wishes someone had approached her to offer her help to escape a violent husband.

“At night time my husband used to shout and abuse me and I’m sure someone in my neighbourhood would’ve been aware that even though I hadn’t talked to anyone, that there was something going on,” she said.

“A friendly approach from a neighbour asking me, ‘What is happening? Do you need any help?’ … that might have made so much difference.

“Rather than not interfering in the neighbour’s problems just being a little bit friendly would’ve helped the situation.

“I had few friends and I was not aware that I was going through domestic violence so if someone had told me or helped me that might’ve made a difference.”

Lucy recalls a night she ran out into the street screaming for help in fear of her husband.

She said a neighbour came to her aid and may have saved her life.

“She was very brave because I’d never spoken to her before,” Lucy said.

“I was just calling out, ‘Please somebody help me’, and she came running out and just took me in, she gave me a blanket because I was shivering with fear.

Family violence support services:

  • 1800 Respect national helpline 1800 737 732
  • Women’s Crisis Line 1800 811 811
  • Men’s Referral Service 1300 766 491
  • Lifeline (24 hour crisis line) 131 114
  • Relationships Australia 1300 364 277

Domestic violence is also responsible for the horrible spate of brain injuries among the victims as highlighted in Domestic violence victims suffer ‘shocking’ rate of brain injury, report finds.

Researchers from Victoria’s Monash University examined data from hospital admissions between July 2006 and June 2017, and found that 40 per cent of 16,000 family violence victims had sustained a brain injury.

While the victims were most often women, the report found nearly one in three of the victims were children — and one in four of them had sustained a brain injury.

“They’re shocking figures and yet the vast majority of women who experience family violence don’t get medical attention,” said Nick Rushworth, chief executive of Brain Injury Australia.

“So it’s bound to be the tip of a very large iceberg.

“While around 1,800 victims of family violence go to Victorian hospitals each year, there are 26,000 cases referred to specialist family violence services and 37,000 intervention orders sought in the courts.”

Brain Injury Australia has called for the creation of an integrated brain injury and family violence service to support diagnosis, rehabilitation and harm reduction, to bridge what it calls “significant gaps” in service responses and support.

“Australian state and federal governments need to develop a comprehensive system of services for women and children living with the consequences of brain injury from family violence … and that includes everything from screening through to therapeutic supports nationwide,” Mr Rushworth said.

Family violence support services:

  • 1800 Respect national helpline 1800 737 732
  • Women’s Crisis Line 1800 811 811
  • Men’s Referral Service 1300 766 491
  • Lifeline (24 hour crisis line) 131 114
  • Relationships Australia 1300 364 277

 

0 Comments

Leave a reply

Shares
WordPress Security